Cost Effective Home Renovation

Ways to Easily Minimize the Cost of Home Renovations

There are many reasons why homeowners decide to renovate their homes. Maybe your family has expanded and you need more room for everyone to feel comfortable. Maybe your needs have changed and you need an adequate accommodation to meet them. Or maybe your house is just old, worn out and in dire need of a facelift. Regardless of what the reason behind your remodeling is, you need to know that this is an expensive project. However, there are ways to reduce costs during a home renovation. Here are ten of them.

Improve the Efficacy of Available Space

Whenever you think of remodeling a certain space, especially the kitchen, you think of giving it a few extra square feet by probably knocking down the walls. Why not just utilize the available space to maximum instead? You could opt for a cabinet with drawers instead of large shelves that hog up all the space in the kitchen. Invest in the cabinets that are tall, and have wide pull-out drawers. You could also spend some money on the racks and dividers that lets you store all the kitchen supplies without taking up a lot of space.

Consult Multiple Contractors

It is always good to send out requests for multiple contractors, before zeroing in on one of them. You can contact the firms or individuals that provide renovation services in your neighborhood. You could even take suggestions from your friends and family that have recently undergone remodeling of their houses. Once you get some promising leads, reach out to them with the further information and plan about the renovation and ask for quotes. Remember, don’t be in a hurry, and be sure to go with the one that provides best and quality service at a good price.

 

Create and Stick To a Budget

Before we get started, I wanted to talk about what a “budget renovation” means. The word “budget” isn’t synonymous with cheap. Whenever you spend money, it’s a good idea to know how much of your total income or savings is allotted for the purchase, whether it’s simply a meal out, or something big like a new stove. If you’re planning to do work on your home, I recommend starting with a dollar amount that you’re able to spend before you begin making design choices. Then you can price fixtures and materials and begin to get a grasp on what will work with your budget and what won’t.

Pay Cash

It might sound simple, but paying for your project with money you already have will save you a significant amount of money you’d end up paying in interest if you take out a loan or put things on a credit card that you can’t immediately pay off. If you’re renovating in order to sell your home, it might make sense financially to take out a loan when you know there will be a return on your investment and the loan will be paid off quickly. But in general, paying in cash is the best way. If you can’t afford it now, begin thinking about ways you can trim your household budget to save money for your project.

 

 

Consider Long-Term Costs, Not Just Short-Term Gains

If your addition calls for clapboard siding, for instance, you can save more in the long run by ponying up now for the preprimed and prepainted variety. It costs an extra 10 to 20 cents per foot, but you’ll wind up paying for half as many paint jobs down the road.

The reason? Factory finishes are applied on dry wood under controlled conditions—no rain, no harsh sun. I used prefinished claps on my house about ten years ago and the only flaw in the finish is the occasional mildew spot, easily washed off. The paint looks as if it’ll be good for another ten years, easily.”

Consult an Architect

Depending on the scale of your project, you might not need a full-on architectural commission, which involves extensive meetings, multiple job-site visits, and several sets of construction drawings, to the tune of about 8 percent of a project’s construction budget. You might be able to tap an architect’s design savvy by having him undertake a one-time design consultation.

Do Your Own Schlepping

If you’re doing your own project, slash your materials-delivery fees by picking up goods yourself. No pickup truck? For about $400, you can purchase a nearly new single-axle utility trailer online, which you can tow behind your SUV. Get one just big enough to carry 4-by-8 sheet goods flat. Use it for a half-dozen trips, and it’s paid for itself. Find trailers for sale near you via eBay Motors, or try your local classifieds.

 

Save on electricity

During a remodeling, it is almost inevitable for the utility bills to jump up to the skies because of all of the plugged in equipment, but you can do your best to minimize the damage. For example, you can ask your contractor to use energy-efficient equipment and plug out the equipment when it is not in use. Keep in mind that such an extensive electricity use can lead to malfunctions. Tampering with electricity on your own is not only dangerous, but in some countries, it is also illegal, so it would be best to have a professional emergency electrician on your speed dial.

Stick to your original plumbing points

Bathroom reno is among the most expensive projects, and you don’t have to make it even more expensive than it has to be by moving the plumbing. Instead, talk with a professional plumber about how to use the most of your current layout. The same goes for the kitchen and the laundry plumbing points.

 

Pick decent, midgrade materials

Picking premium options or materials can raise the cost of your remodeling project substantially. One area where you’ll find a major price difference? Carpeting.

While basic olefin and polyester carpeting costs around $1 to $2 per square foot, wool can cost upward of $9 to $11 per square foot, according to Angie’s List. Those costs add up if you’re recarpeting a large room or an entire floor.

 Don’t do a complete remodel

Unless the room needs to be completely gutted, you can cut costs by refurbishing existing fixtures. When renovating the kitchen, staining the current cabinetry, replacing old drawer handles and knobs, and refacing moldings can save you thousands of dollars.

In fact, refinishing existing cabinets can save you up to 50% compared with the cost of buying new cabinetry, according to Angie’s List. You can also cut costs by purchasing materials (e.g., granite, flooring, or lighting) yourself

Tips To Cook More Comfort With Kitchen Remodelling

Ways You Can Determine the Right Kitchen Remodel for Your Project

You’ve decided to remodel your kitchen. Now what? Not knowing where to start, many homeowners start by looking at kitchen appliances. Others collect inspiring kitchen photos. Some homeowners decide they need more room. Others simply want to upgrade their current kitchen. Homeowners may find themselves in this exploration stage for a year or longer before they start interviewing kitchen designers or general contractors.

Let’s take a step-by-step look at how to remodel your kitchen.

Think About What You Need in Your Kitchen Remodel
This step is all about figuring out how you use your kitchen, and finding the layout and features that fit your household’s lifestyle.

Think about your priorities and ask yourself some questions. How many people will be cooking and gathering here? How will they need to move around? Do you need an addition, or can you work with your existing kitchen footprint?
If you haven’t done so already, start saving photos of kitchens with features that suit your style. Your collection can be organized and beautiful like a scrapbook might be, or it can be filled with unorganized images. I like to randomly stuff images into my folders and ideabooks and go back to them later for edits.

 

Planning a Kitchen Layout

More than any room in the house, the kitchen needs to be practical and functional. Think about how you use your current kitchen to identify your priorities for the remodeled space. What works and what doesn’t? Give considerable thought to the layout of the room and assess what will work best for your household.

Whenever possible, make use of the classic work triangle. Arrange the sink, refrigerator, and stove (the three features used the most) in a triangular pattern. This is generally considered to be the most convenient setup because it saves unnecessary steps.

Also, think about how many people usually work in the kitchen at the same time. If it’s more than one, you might want to incorporate more than one workstation. Or, if there’s enough space, consider adding an island or purchase a wheeled cart that can be moved around the room and put away when not in use.

 

Finishing the Walls

Once a renovation project passes inspection, it is time to finish the walls. Hang, tape, and finish drywall according to your project plan. This includes any drywall necessary for a countertop bar or other section of the kitchen. If you aren’t skilled in this area, consider hiring a contractor to finish up the process.

This is also an optimum step to add a coat of primer to the drywall, even though you won’t add paint for quite some time. Why? The primer seals the facing paper and protects it against scuffs and scrapes when installing other items in the room. Accidents easily happen when you’re moving bulky cabinetry and appliances into the space, and this keeps it in great shape until you’re ready to add a splash of your favorite color later on in the renovation process.

Install Doors and Windows

After drywall, it is time to install any doors or windows. If you’re sticking with the same structure as your old kitchen, you might not have to do anything for this step. Simply take the time to wipe down your old ones with a good cleaner and seal any existing cracks around the windows with caulking to help insulate more effectively.

If you’re adding new doors or windows to the space, make sure to insulate them properly. A vast majority of a home’s energy cost each year comes from lost hot and cold air. Unsealed kitchen windows not only make your space less comfortable, but they could also cost you hundreds of dollars in heating and cooling bills.

 

Install Cabinetry

Even if you’re handling the renovation yourself, consider hiring a professional to install cabinets for you. The last thing you want is to get your cabinets up and start refilling them only to have them fall down or to realize you didn’t level them properly. A professional will make sure the cabinets are installed properly.

Open Shelving

Floating and open shelving is trending in homes across America. This design concept is loved by many designers as well, because it allows you to use your well-designed kitchenware as décor.

 

Bring in the Pros

There are two main players when it comes to professional kitchen remodeling help:

  • A kitchen designer
  • A general contractor

A kitchen designer ensures that your kitchen space is functional, efficient and the best value for your budget. They take the time to learn your needs and wants. Then they translate those into a functional, beautiful, and actionable plan.

A general contractor (GC) coordinates the build-out and installation of the kitchen designer’s plans. The GC is in charge of organizing products, materials and people. They schedule work for the trade professionals typically involved in kitchen renovations such as electricians, plumbers, tile professionals, fabricators, and finish carpenters.

Start early and be proactive with bringing in professionals. Their expertise will help you make better remodeling decisions, and making early appointments will ensure that you have a spot on their calendars. The most well-regarded pros have very busy schedules, and it’s common for a contractor to be booked months in advance.

What about interior design or architectural services? If you’re remodeling your entire house, or making major structural changes, you may have an interior designer or architect helping to coordinate the project. But if you’re only remodeling a kitchen, their services are not critical, even though they can add significant costs to the project.

Between you, your kitchen designer and your general contractor, you should able to make sure that your kitchen is decorated, designed and built to your liking.

Happy remodeling!